Dr James Hudson

  • Address
    University of Queensland
    QLD

Dr Hudson completed a double major in Chemical and Biological Engineering in 2006 at The University of Queensland. He subsequently completed his PhD in the Justin Cooper-White Lab at The University of Queensland in 2011 in the tissue engineering field. Dr Hudson then completed postdoctoral training under the guidance of Prof Wolfram-Hubertus Zimmermann (Göttingen, Germany), one of the most prominent cardiac tissue engineering researchers. Dr Hudson was subsequently awarded a prestigious NHMRC Early Career fellowship and was recruited to the School of Biomedical Sciences at The University of Queensland in 2013. In 2014, Dr Hudson became co-head of the Cardiac Regeneration Lab together with Dr Enzo Porrello and together they are working on finding novel therapeutics to facilitate cardiac regeneration.
During his postdoctoral studies Dr Hudson has developed protocols for the highly efficient and reproducible production of human and non-human primate cardiac cells from pluripotent stem cells. Additionally, Dr Hudson has developed new methods for the formation of bioengineered heart muscle directly from pluripotent stem cells in collagen I hydrogels. Together this work has resulted in 2 patents and 2 manuscripts in preparation. These techniques have now enabled the production of force generating cardiac muscle for drug discovery applications and also potentially as a therapeutic when implanted directly onto patients with heart failure. Pre-clinical studies to delivery large cardiac tissues to non-human primates using this technology have begun in Prof Wolfram-Hubertus Zimmermann’s lab in Göttingen, Germany. However, Dr Hudson has shifted his focus to using the human cardiac tissues as a model system to complement the in vivo regeneration models developed by Dr Enzo Porrello for the discovery of novel regenerative therapeutics. Their laboratory at The University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, is trying to unravel the molecular mechanisms that drive cardiac regeneration.